Can I get car insurance with a DUI? 36 Answers as of June 15, 2011

When an insurance company wants to know if you've had any DUI's in the last 10 years, can they really find that out? Or can I withhold that information from them?

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Anderson & Carnahan
Anderson & Carnahan | Stephen Anderson
They can find out if they run your motor vehicle record.
Answer Applies to: Colorado
Replied: 6/15/2011
Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
They can and will find that out.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 6/13/2011
Bloom Legal, LLC
Bloom Legal, LLC | Seth J. Bloom
You should not withhold that information from your insurance company. If you were to do so and they were to eventually pull your criminal record and discover a DUI it could potentially void your entire insurance policy if you were to be involved in an accident which would leave you stuck with the bill. What you can do is pursue an expungement to have the DUI conviction removed from your criminal record. This is something our firm handles on a regular basis. If you are seeking legal representation in this matter in Louisiana, we invite you to contact our firm at the information on this page for a free case evaluation.
Answer Applies to: Louisiana
Replied: 6/13/2011
Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC
Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC | Jacob Peter Sartz IV
Generally speaking, yes, you can get car insurance even with a DUI conviction; however, it will probably cost more money. Barring some very usual circumstances, most DUI's will show up during a routine background check and on your driving record as well. No, you should not withhold that information. Honesty if the best policy. If their quote is too high, simply move on and get a quote from a different insurer. Thanks to the internet, it is now fairly easy to obtain multiple quotes. Many insurance applications put very specific and harsh language about the consequences of failing to disclose certain pertinent information. DUI's potentially stay on a person's driving record and criminal history for a very long time. Barring some usual circumstance where a DUI is sealed or expunged from a person's driving record and criminal history, there should be some record that a prospective insurer could find. The prospective insurer may, at some point, conduct their own review of a client's records. If a person signs a contract and deliberately withholds information about a prior DUI conviction, failing to disclose that information will be viewed in a negative light and, in addition to possible criminal charges, could be grounds for the insurer to void the insurance policy.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 6/13/2011
Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law
Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law | Thomas J. Tomko
Yes, you can get insurance, however, the cost will increase. You should contact the insurance company for rates. I hope that this was helpful.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 6/10/2011
    The Law Office of Randall S. Woodard
    The Law Office of Randall S. Woodard | Randall Scott Woodard
    You can get insurance it will just be more costly. In Illinois typically a person with a DUI is required to have what is referred to as SR-22 insurance which is expensive. Your insurance company has access to the Secretary of State's records and now normally a DUI is never removed from your record. Be careful not to misrepresent a material fact to your insurance company, it is not only a crime but could result in a denial of coverage.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Timothy J. Thill P.C.
    Timothy J. Thill P.C. | Timothy J. Thill
    All the insurance company will do is get a copy of your driving abstract from the DMV, or in Illinois, the Secretary of State's office. If you were convicted of the offense, and given any sentence other than an order of Supervision, they will find that out. If you got supervision, they will not be given that information, as it is classified and available to law-enforcement agencies and the courts, only! In any case, certain insurance companies will insure you with a DUI on your record, however, the premium will be costlier to you than normal insurance.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    The Law Firm of Aaron Bortel Esq.
    The Law Firm of Aaron Bortel Esq. | Aaron Bortel
    All they have to do is check your DMV record. It costs them almost nothing to do so. They are checking more than they used to check. If you withhold the information, and sign something under penalty of perjury saying you have no prior DUI's in 10 years, you are asking for trouble, or possible non coverage on a claim.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Law Offices of Scott G. Hilderman
    Law Offices of Scott G. Hilderman | Scott G. Hilderman
    You can withhold information from them but if they find out they will use it against you on rates or even to give you any insurance. They have a nation wide data base that lets them know your driving history.
    Answer Applies to: Montana
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C.
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C. | Craig Elhart
    The insurance company can obtain the information that is on your master driving record with the secretary of state. Withholding information, if found out later, may cause the company to cancel the coverage. In Michigan, first party benefits of no fault are mandatory. With a OWI, it is typical for the insurance company to require you to obtain coverage from the high risk pool. Coverage is available, it's just what is the cost.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Law Office of Andrew Subin
    Law Office of Andrew Subin | Andrew Subin
    Most likely they will be able to find out.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    Most insurers will cancel coverage when they learn that a driver has had a DWI. You would likely be offered risk insurance coverage with significantly higher premiums. The best way to proceed after a DWI is not to purchase an new vehicle and not to change insurance coverage. The auto insurer will often only discovery the infraction when a random check is performed unless there is a change in coverage.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Law Office of Thomas F. Mueller
    Law Office of Thomas F. Mueller | Thomas Mueller
    You can. And it is never a good idea to withhold info from an Ins. Co. To do so could result in your coverage being denied. You don't want that.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
    You can get insurance with prior DUIs, however they rates may be high. The insurance companies can access your driving records if you apply for their insurance coverage, you will not be able to hide a DUI.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    The insurance company can get a copy of your DMV and criminal record and will factor the convictions into your rate along with where you live, what type of car you drive, and what type of coverage you want. If you lie to them they may not pay off when you have an accident and they will find out anyway. You should go online and compare rates with at least 10 companies, Geico, Allstate, State Farm, The General, and others will give you a quote on the phone.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    A conviction for DUI is a permanent record and is open for public inspection. Your automobile insurance provider is almost certain to find out about a DUI conviction if they request a copy of your driving record.I would suggest that you be candid and truthful with your insurance provider. There are automobile insurance providers who will provide insurance for you even with a DUI conviction.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Austin Legal Services, PLC
    Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
    They can certainly find out if it is still apart of your public record. Unless it's been expunged, it's a part of your public record. They could also know if someone from the office has direct knowledge, i.e. they were in court when you plead guilty, they were on your jury, etc. You can probably get insurance from most companies with DUIs, but expect it too be much higher. If you have multiple DUIs, then that's a different story.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Harris Law Firm
    Harris Law Firm | Jennifer C. Robins
    Insurance companies can find out if you have a DUII on your record, and it may prohibit you from obtaining insurance with some companies, or affect the rates. Progressive other smaller companies such as E-Surance and The General may be easier to obtain insurance with if there is a DUII on the record.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly | Brendan M. Kelly
    Sorry, but an insurance company can find out with your drivers license.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
    Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
    They have access as a result of your contract with them to your DMV driving record so there is no way to avoid their knowing about it and it is certainly not a good idea to lie to them.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Eric M. Mark, Attorney at Law
    Eric M. Mark, Attorney at Law | Eric Mark
    They can find out. They will issue you insurance at a higher premium, most likely. Lying about it could be insurance fraud.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    LT Pepper Law
    LT Pepper Law | Luke T. Pepper
    If you withhold the information and they grant insurance, you can be denied coverage if you are involved in an accident since you lied to them
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    Arnold & Wadsworth
    Arnold & Wadsworth | Brian Arnold
    I would not advise you to withhold information from them. It is a business, you do not have a right to car insurance.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Law Offices of Phil Hache
    Law Offices of Phil Hache | Phil Hache
    You can get insurance with a DUI. Some insurance companies may try to increase your premium depending on how recent the DUI conviction was, but there are insurance companies out there who still give reasonable rates (potentially even lower than before you had a DUI). To further answer your question, an Insurance company can pull up your DMV record, which would show the DUI conviction.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Michael Anthony Wing, P.C.
    Michael Anthony Wing, P.C. | Michael Anthony Wing
    It's just not worth it to lie because when you need the coverage and they find the old DUI, you will have no coverage. Not only can the truth set you free, it can cover your backside. Stay well.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Theodore W. Robinson, P.C.
    Theodore W. Robinson, P.C. | Theodore W. Robinson
    Yes, they can find that out and if you do withhold that information from them, and they later discover it, they will drop you like a hot potato and may disclaim coverage if you later have an accident and need your insurance coverage. It's best not to withhold such information. Pay the difference and be covered. It's better in the long run. Good luck.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC | Rankin Johnson IV
    They can find out. You can't keep it secret, and, in Oregon, traffic convictions, including DUII, and DUII diversions, cannot be expunged or sealed. You can still get insurance, but the rate will probably be higher.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Howard W. Collins, Attorney at Law
    Howard W. Collins, Attorney at Law | Howard W. Collins
    Yes they can find it out. The DUII stay on your record forever. As a condition of getting car insurance, I am pretty sure you are giving them consent to do a criminal and traffic history report.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Law Office of Jonathan T. Sarre
    Law Office of Jonathan T. Sarre | Jonathan T. Sarre
    They probably can gain access to your driving record so lying about it may not be the way to go. You can usually still get car insurance, but it will cost you more.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Fitzpatrick, Mariano, & Santos, PC
    Fitzpatrick, Mariano, & Santos, PC | Raymond J. Savoy
    The insurance company can request your driving history which will show all moving violations, including dui.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    San Diego DUI Law Center
    San Diego DUI Law Center | Rick Mueller
    Yes. An SR-22 isn't a type of insurance coverage, but rather proof that you have insurance. It is notification from your insurance company to the DMV that you have auto liability insurance in effect in the State of California which satisfies the minimum insurance coverage required by the State. This insurance notification is typically required by the State for 3 years from the date the original suspension would have ended which can be determined, e.g., by adding 4 months from the date you were given the "pink" temporary license (assuming you are a first offender without a refusal of the chemical test). If your policy lapses for any reason (miss a payment, get cancelled) the insurance carrier is REQUIRED to notify the DMV who is supposed to then notify you that you will have to file another SR-22 with them by a certain date or your license will be suspended. This form, typically filed electronically, is the only form the The Department of Motor Vehicles will accept. They will not accept any other form as a substitute for the SR-22. When is the SR 22 required? This will be required by you if: (1) you were arrested for a DUI and; (2) you have your license suspended or restricted and/or; (3) if you are required to take a DUI program and; (4) you want to get a restricted license. To get a restricted license, you have to do 3 things: (Not immediately - only if you lose your DMV hearing or get convicted in Court) (1) Pay DMV re-issue fee(s). (2)Provide DMV proof of financial responsibility (SR-22). (3)Provide DMV proof of enrollment in approved DUI program. Insurance minimums in California:For private passenger vehicles per accident: $15,000 for injury/death to one person. $30,000 for injury/death to more than one person. $5,000 for damage to property. Moving to Another State:If you currently have an SR-22 and want to move to another state you must maintain the SR-22 like you still live in California - even though you no longer reside here. Also, your insurance policy for the new state must have liability minimums required by law in California. This applies even if you move to one of the states that does not have SR-22 insurance: Delaware, Kentucky, Minnesota, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Pennsylvania. Already convicted and need a license?First, make sure you are eligible for at least a restricted license by calling the California DMV at 1 (800) 777-0133. Then follow the steps above. Other related information:If you insurance company cancels your insurance because of your conviction, you will receive a notice indicating that your vehicle registration will be suspended if new insurance information is not submitted within 45 days. Already agreed to enter a guilty plea or didn't request a DMV hearing? If you think you are going to be convicted, make sure you contact an insurance broker BEFORE the conviction appears on your record. A skilled insurance broker can often times save you from being cancelled or having your insurances rates double (typical through State Farm for example) once a DUI conviction appears on your record. Additionally, you should know that although your SR 22 can be filed electronically you should be able to get an original from your insurance company and hand deliver it to the DMV so that you don't have to wait for the clerks in Sacramento to do their job - which they do slowly. Or, Generally, How to Downshift Your Insurance Costs with Smarter, Cheaper Coverage 1) Nab Discounts Most insurers offer price cuts for such things as: - having anti-lock brakes; - having been accident-free; - having taken a defensive-driving course; - using the same insurer for your home policy. (For more info., visit the auto insurance checklist at http://iii.org/individuals/auto .) These can take up to 25% off your premium. But your insurer usually will not come to you with them so you have to call the company and find out what the discounts are. 2) Raise your deductible. The point of vehicle insurance is to protect you from catastrophic costs (your emergency fund should cover stuff like dents and broken windows). Raise your deductible from say $200 to $1,000 and you could save more than 40% on premiums, according to the Insurance Information Institute. 3) Prune coverage on old vehicles. Once your vehicle is worth less than 10 times what you pay each year to insure it, get rid of the comprehensive and collision. Find your vehicle's estimated worth at www.kbb.com. 4) Dig up competing quotes. This is the most work but could have the greatest payoff. Go to www.naic.org to find your state insurance commission website, where you can download a vehicle insurance buying guide. Pick the example closest to you and the 5 insurers with the lowest rates. Call them for quotes. If the state guide doesn't list insurers, get the 5 best quotes at www.insweb.com but note that the site doesn't include State Farm. Next, check with an independent agent (get a name at www.iiaba.net) to see if any insurers you haven't checked can beat your top 5. 5) Sidestep hassle by making sure any insurer with a better quote is legitimate. Go to your state's insurance commission site - look especially for the ratio of complaints to # of policies written.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Michael Breczinski
    Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
    Yes you can find insurance with a DUI but it will cost you and yes they can access your driving record and find out if you have had prior DUIs.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Nichols Law Firm
    Nichols Law Firm | Michael J. Nichols
    Yes but it will be more expensive.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    They can easily find that out by running your driving record.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/9/2011
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