Can I file a lawsuit if my boss told me that I have to have sex with him when I ask to move up in the business? 21 Answers as of March 31, 2014

My boss told me and another person to sit on his lap for a Christmas bonus. And when I ask to move up in the business he said I have to have sex with him. When I told him I wouldn't he moved my hours to eight hours a week. It is to the point where I don’t even want to work for him. I’m not sure what I need to do. Are these grounds to sue for sexual harassment?

Ask a Local Attorney. 100% Anonymous. Free Answers.

Free Case Evaluation by a Local Lawyer: Click here
Universal Law Group, Inc. | Francis John Cowhig
They can be. I strongly suggest that you contact an experienced employment law attorney for a face-to-face consultation and give him/her all of the facts surrounding your situation. (S)he would then be in a better position to analyze your case and advise you of your options.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/31/2014
Law Office of Nathan Wagner
Law Office of Nathan Wagner | Nathan J. Wagner
Yes, these are grounds to sue for sexual harassment. You should talk to a local attorney who specializes in workplace harassment and discrimination cases. Many such attorneys offer free or low-cost initial consultations.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/28/2014
Michael Breczinski
Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
Yes. This is totally improper and it is also a crime.? He is soliciting prostitution.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 3/28/2014
Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC
Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC | John F Brennan
See an attorney, it is a classic case.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 3/27/2014
Burton Employment Law | Jocelyn Burton
You probably have a claim for quid pro quo sexual harassment. A cause of action for quid pro quo harassment involves the behavior most commonly regarded as sexual harassment, including for example, sexual propositions, unwarranted graphic discussions of sexual acts, and commentary on the employee's body and the sexual uses to which it could be put. In quid pro quo harassment, a term of employment is conditioned upon submission to unwelcome sexual advances. Here, advancement and full-time employment appear to be condition upon submission to your supervisor's advances. You should consult a lawyer as soon as possible.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/27/2014
    Law Offices of Linda Rose Fessler | Linda Fessler
    File a complaint with the Department of Fair Employment and Housing.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/27/2014
    MatthewR. Schutz, Esq | Matthew R. Schutz
    Yes you do have a law suit. You need to consult with a sexual harassment specialist.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 3/26/2014
    Peters Law, PLLC
    Peters Law, PLLC | Mark T. Peters, Sr.
    File a complaint with HR and with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission now.
    Answer Applies to: Idaho
    Replied: 3/26/2014
    Nancy Wallace, Attorney at Law
    Nancy Wallace, Attorney at Law | Nancy Wallace
    You can always file a lawsuit (if you can find a lawyer to pay all those filing fees and prepare and serve the action). But how can you possibly prove this? Do you have people willing to testify against the company likely being reprimanded or losing their jobs that they heard these precise words exchanged? Do you have a videotape? I'm confident you heard this, but I'm seriously doubting you have any way to prove this happened and you'll just be asked to resign and this creep will keep going.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/26/2014
    Strouse Legal Services | James C. Strouse
    Yes, these are grounds. It is a very good case. Get other person for a witness.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 3/26/2014
    Law Office of Richard Winkler | Richard Winkler
    If the facts are truly as you represent them to be, you have set forth the critical elements necessary for 'quid pro quo' sexual harassment. You can either hire an attorney or go directly to your state human rights commission and file a complaint (it costs you nothing to do that). Your facts suggest the kind of case attorneys dream about.
    Answer Applies to: Rhode Island
    Replied: 3/26/2014
    Fluhr & Moore, LLC | Steven S. Fluhr
    Yes. You need to go to the EEOC or the Missouri department of human rights.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 3/26/2014
    WILLIAM L SANDERS, ATTORNEY AT LAW | William L. Sanders
    Very likely yes. Do not put up with this, stand up for yourself and all the women that come after you. You should consult immediately with an attorney that handles discrimination cases.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 3/26/2014
    KEYL ADR Services, LLC | Mark D. Keyl
    I would report this to the EEOC, and have the other individual also file. This is sexual harassment.
    Answer Applies to: Mississippi
    Replied: 3/26/2014
    Austin Legal Services, PLC
    Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
    Yes, that would certainly be grounds for a lawsuit. Look for an attorney that practices civil law with experience in sexual harassment and hostile work environment lawsuits.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 3/26/2014
    The Niskar Law Firm, PLLC
    The Niskar Law Firm, PLLC | Joey Niskar
    Both federal and most states' law prohibit sex discrimination, which includes sexual harassment. If the boss refused to promote you unless you refused to have sex with him, and retaliated against you for refusing to have sex with him, then that would most likely constitute a form of unlawful sexual harassment known as "quid pro quo" sexual harassment. You should consult with an attorney who specializes in handing employment discrimination cases.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 3/26/2014
    Lawrence Lewis
    Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
    YES. So you have the $ 5000 to retain an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 3/27/2014
    Geneva Yourse | Geneva Yourse
    Yes, those are grounds for sexual harassment. If you have more than 15 employees you are protected under the Federal Title VII laws against discrimination. You have 180 days (6 months) to file a complaint with the EEOC. You can call the EEOC and talk with them about the discrimination. They will draft the complaint for you and send it to you for your signature. I suggest you do so immediately.
    Answer Applies to: North Carolina
    Replied: 3/26/2014
    Gates' Law, PLLC | Thomas E. Gates
    You first must file a complaint with your HR department. If they refuse to cat, then hire a employment attorney to assist you.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 3/26/2014
    Fox & Fox, S.C. | Richard F. Rice
    Probably. You should immediately contact an attorney to represent you with your matter.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 3/27/2014
    Law Office of James E. Smith
    Law Office of James E. Smith | James Smith
    File a Complaint with the Equal Rights Commission. You have to get a right to sue letter from them to sue.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 3/26/2014
Click to View More Answers:
12 3 4 Free Legal QuestionsConnect with a local attorney