Can I convert a chapter 13 to a chapter 7? 12 Answers as of March 25, 2011

Can I convert a chapter 13 to a chapter 7?

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Law Offices of Michael J. Berger
Law Offices of Michael J. Berger | Michael J. Berger
Yes, if you qualify for a Chapter 7.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/25/2011
Financial Relief Law Center
Financial Relief Law Center | Mark Alonso
A Chapter 13 can be converted to a Chapter 7 assuming you pass the means test for a CH 7.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/22/2011
Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney
Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney | Janet Lawson
Simple answer, Yes. But you need to make sure your income is low enough to get a Chapter 7 discharge.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/22/2011
Indianapolis Bankruptcy Law Office of Eric C. Lewis
Indianapolis Bankruptcy Law Office of Eric C. Lewis | Eric Lewis
Conversion of a Chapter 13 to a Chapter 7 is very fact specific to the situation so to answer your question, the answer is maybe. If you are not barred by a previous Chapter 7 filing and your present income and expenses allow for it, you may be able to convert to a Chapter 7 and get a discharge through that means of bankruptcy relief.
Answer Applies to: Indiana
Replied: 3/22/2011
Mercado & Hartung, PLLC
Mercado & Hartung, PLLC | Christopher J. Mercado
If you haven't previously converted from another Chapter, and you are eligible for a Ch 7, and you qualify. Section 1307(a) allows you to convert a Ch 13 to a Ch 7 for any reason, any time and for any reason. It's an absolute right, with no restrictions.
Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 3/22/2011
    Cohen & Kendziorra, P.A.
    Cohen & Kendziorra, P.A. | Robert S. Cohen
    Yes you can and it is quite common.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 3/22/2011
    Gus Johnson Attorney at Law
    Gus Johnson Attorney at Law | Gus Johnson
    Yes, but it requires court approval
    Answer Applies to: South Dakota
    Replied: 3/22/2011
    Ferguson & Ferguson
    Ferguson & Ferguson | Randy W. Ferguson
    Yes, however, you must talk to attorney before doing.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 3/22/2011
    Carballo Law Offices
    Carballo Law Offices | Tony E. Carballo
    Yes, you have the right to do that with rare exceptions and it is very simple to do. You have to file a motion for an order converting the case. It is usually automatically granted. You must be eligible to be a Debtor in a Chapter 7 case and must be eligible for a discharge in the Chapter 7 case because otherwise there would be no benefit in converting the case. Before you start converting make sure you are represented by a bankruptcy attorney and fully understand the risks and benefits of converting a Chapter 13 to Chapter 7 bankruptcy case. There are risks involved that you cannot even imagine if you are not a bankruptcy lawyer. You cannot convert back to Chapter 13 in the opinion of most bankruptcy judges.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/22/2011
    The Orantes Law Firm
    The Orantes Law Firm | Giovanni Orantes
    Yes. You are allowed to change a Chapter 13 case to a chapter 7 case if you qualified for the Chapter 7 case when you first filed the Chapter 13 case.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/21/2011
    Law Office of L. Paul Zahn
    Law Office of L. Paul Zahn | Paul Zahn
    Yes. You are entitled to convert a chapter 13 to a 7 (if you otherwise qualify for a chapter 7 to begin with). I would strongly suggest speaking with a bankruptcy attorney before attempting this.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/21/2011
    Law Offices of Joseph A. Mannis
    Law Offices of Joseph A. Mannis | Todd Mannis
    Provided some other circumstances, such as a prior Chapter 7 filed within the past eight years, yes, you can. Should you wish to discuss your situation further, please give us a ring, our consultation is free.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/21/2011
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