Can I contact the District of Attorney and plea this out or do I have to appear One- count of theft, one- count of forgery? 45 Answers as of June 13, 2013

I have three-count false information to workmen’s compensation. I was not notified of charges prior to being arrested on a FOJ. Am I going to jail?

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Law office of Robert D. Scott | Robert Scott
You must appear and jail time might be the result.
Answer Applies to: Maryland
Replied: 9/12/2012
Law & Mediation Office of Jeffrey L. Pollock, Esq.
Law & Mediation Office of Jeffrey L. Pollock, Esq. | Jeffrey Lawrence Pollock
Hire counsel so that you can turn yourself in on the warrant and then plead out to the charges.
Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
Replied: 9/6/2012
Hamblin Law Office | Sally Hamblin
You can work with prosecutor, not on the phone, to plea. You must appear in court.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 9/6/2012
Law Office of Richard Southard
Law Office of Richard Southard | Richard C Southard
You should not do anything except hire an attorney to speak to the DA on your behalf.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 9/6/2012
Law Office of Phillip Weiser
Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
You can plea to the charges, but you will still need to appear in court.
Answer Applies to: Kansas
Replied: 9/6/2012
    Natty Shafer Law
    Natty Shafer Law | Nathaniel Shafer
    At some point you will have to appear in court to either plea or to enter a not guilty charge. A judge has to formally accept a guilty plea for it to be official, so you need to appear in court for that. You could potentially go to jail for the charges, but it depends on your criminal history and what the prosecutor is willing to accept as a plea.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Law Office of Ronald G. Draper | Ronald G. Draper
    That would not be a smart thing to do. Consult with a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
    Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
    You should hire an attorney to represent you. You probably will have to appear in court even if you want to plead guilty, it is done on the record in court.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Stephen D. Hebert, LLC | Stephen Hebert
    You will most likely have to be arrested, and, in turn, subject to some type of bond obligation. Before turning yourself in, you should retain counsel and acquire the help of a close friend to assist with the bail process.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Leonard A. Kaanta, P.C. | Leonard A. Kaanta
    You need an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/13/2013
    Myles Hahn III Attorney at Law | Myles Hahn III
    Retain an attorney immediately. Try to find one who has handled this kind of case. Contact a Bar Association of your city or county for a referral.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Amber Lunsford, Attorney at Law | Amber Lunsford
    You should never deal with the district attorney directly. This is something your lawyer or public defender does for various reasons, chiefly because anything you say that is against your interests is useable against you and may make them stick their heels in more, if negotiating a plea is what you are looking for. If you go to trial, they will try to use any admissions you may make against you (successfully, most of the time. There are conflicting hearsay rules here: (1) admissions or statements against interest are useable against you under a hearsay exception; and (2) things said in negotiations for settlement should not be admissible. However, Judges usually prefer the first rule as it leads to more efficient convictions and falls within the spirit of the old prop 8 (called the "truth in evidence" rule) which loosens restrictions on many evidence rules in criminal trials. This is just one of the many pitfalls that comes from dealing with the DA. You wouldn't pull your own wisdom teeth or take out your own appendix. Let your lawyer do this.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Law Office of Christopher G Humphrey PC | Christopher G Humphrey
    Ask for the court to appoint you an attorney. The district attorney may or may not talk to you.
    Answer Applies to: Wyoming
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law
    Gregory Casale Attorney at Law | Gregory Casale
    Unless you have a significant previous criminal history or the charges are more egregious than you have presented them, you should be able to avoid jail get by with some costs and probation. I am assuming you have adequate legal representation. I would not recommend going to court without good legal counsel.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Universal Law Group, Inc. | Francis John Cowhig
    Your question requires an attorney consultation. It is not a simple question that can be answered on this type of forum. there are many factors that would need to be considered and evaluated. I strongly suggest that you contact an experienced criminal law attorney for a face-to-face consultation and give him/her all of the facts surrounding your arrest. He/she would then be in a better position to analyze your case and advise you of your options.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Law Offices of Phil Hache
    Law Offices of Phil Hache | Phil Hache
    Jail is a possibility. You or your attorney needs to appear in court. Get an attorney to fight the case and mitigate consequences.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Steven Alpers | Steven Alpers
    Possibly, you need a lawyer to protect your rights and limit the charge you plead to and/or whether you have to go to jail.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Law Firm of Martin & Wallentine
    Law Firm of Martin & Wallentine | Jerry Lee Wallentine Jr.
    You should not contact the DA. Have your criminal defense lawyer handle all negotiations.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Lawrence Lewis
    Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
    You have a dozen questions. All of which will be answered by the DA, after you contact them. Between your fugitive from justice, and false info, you should expect the prosecutor to offer you a prison sentence. You think you are as clever as a defense attorney. So, go to the DA and see what you can work out.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Gates' Law, PLLC | Thomas E. Gates
    You must make a court appearance. Yes, you may spend some jail time.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Law Office of James A Schoenberger
    Law Office of James A Schoenberger | James A Schoenberger
    You will be arraigned on the charges and bail set. Personal recognizance (no bail) is possible if you have no prior criminal history.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/6/2012
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    Every crime carries jail time potential. You can only "deal" with the charges in court, not directly with the DA?s office. Your first court appearance is an arraignment, where you will plead not guilty, and set a next appearance date for PreTrial Conference where plea bargaining can occur. When questioned, arrested or charged with any crime, the proper questions are, can any evidence obtained in a test, search or statement be used against you, can you be convicted, and what can you do? A little free advice: exercise the 5th Amendment right to shut up and do not talk to police or anyone about the case except with and through an attorney. Raise all appropriate defenses with whatever witnesses, evidence and sympathies are available for legal arguments, for evidence suppression or other motions, or for trial. Effective plea-bargaining, using those defenses, could possibly reduce the potential time and other penalties you face. While this isn't a 'capital case', you certainly face fines and potential jail, so handle it right. No amount of free 'tips and hints' from here or elsewhere are going to effectively help you in your legal defense. If you don't know how to represent yourself effectively against an experienced prosecutor intending to convict, then hire an attorney who does, who will try to get a dismissal, charge reduction, diversion, program, or other decent outcome through motions, plea bargain, or take it to trial if appropriate.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/3/2012
    James M. Osak, P.C.
    James M. Osak, P.C. | James M. Osak
    It all depends on the prosecutor. You'll probably have to appear.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/3/2012
    Palumbo and Kosofsky
    Palumbo and Kosofsky | Michael Palumbo
    You are facing jail time and need counsel.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 9/3/2012
    Law Office of Mark Bruce
    Law Office of Mark Bruce | Mark Corwin Bruce
    Do not talk to law enforcement or the DA on this charge. You should either hire a lawyer or ask for a public defender when the time for arraignment comes. If you have already been arrested and released, you won't be reincarcerated until the case is finished.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/3/2012
    Michael Breczinski
    Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
    Get an attorney the way you have written your question tells me that you really need one.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 6/13/2013
    Lee Law Group | Ernest Lee
    You need an attorney who can work out one plea for all your charges.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/13/2013
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    You could, but you would be the dumbest person on planet earth. Hire a lawyer and exerise your right to remain silent. You will go to jail if you take the wrong steps, so tread carefully.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 9/3/2012
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC | Rankin Johnson IV
    Don't plead guilty to a crime without talking to a lawyer. If you can't afford a lawyer, the court will appoint one. If you can afford a lawyer but don't want to pay a few thousand dollars, you may end up with more time in jail, longer probation, or higher fines and expenses anyway. A lawyer will do a better job getting a fair deal, even if you are guilty and want to accept responsibility. I can understand why, if you're guilty, you want to just admit it and accept the court's judgment. But the overwhelming majority of people with charges like yours don't just plead guilty to all of them; they plead guilty to some, or have an agreement about the sentence before pleading guilty. The system expects to give you, and you are entitled to receive, a sentence comparable to the sentences of people who committed crime similar to yours. If you just plead guilty without counsel, you are likely to get a higher-than-average sentence. Of course, the details are crucial, and if you get a thoughtful judge and a reasonable prosecutor, simply pleading to the charges might lead to a fair sentence. But it's a foolish risk to take without counsel.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 9/3/2012
    Expert Bronx Criminal Lawyers
    Expert Bronx Criminal Lawyers | Alexander Sanchez
    Do not contact the District Attorney-contact a criminal defense lawyer. The lawyer will speak to the District Attorney on your behalf. Any statements you make to the DA can be used against use, so a defense lawyer's intervention is crucial. As far as facing jail, this depends on the facts of the case, the evidence against you, the amount of loss occurred by your actions, and your prior background.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 9/3/2012
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC | Timothy J. Klisz
    Yes, you have to appear and yes, jail can be a possibility. Get an attorney right away.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 9/3/2012
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    This District Attorney is not likely to work for you they are against you. Contacting them may be the best way I can think of to get yourself some substantial prison time. Try hiring an attorney as they will work for you and against the District Attorney. Contacting them may be the best way I can think of to keep yourself from getting some substantial prison time. If you are unable to hire an attorney, and you qualify as an indigent request that the court appoint an attorney to assist you. Make no statements and do not try to get yourself out of this one without an attorney to assist you.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 9/3/2012
    Fairlie & Lippy, P.C.
    Fairlie & Lippy, P.C. | Steven Fairlie
    You should talk with a good lawyer before contacting the DA which could be a fatal mistake if you have a valid defense.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 9/3/2012
    Abom & Kutulakis, L.L.P,.
    Abom & Kutulakis, L.L.P,. | Jason P. Kutulakis
    There is not enough information provided to answer your questions. Many factors impact a criminal sentence (for example - prior record).
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 9/3/2012
    Law Office of Michael Morgan, l.L.C.
    Law Office of Michael Morgan, l.L.C. | Michael Morgan
    You will have to appear in court and there is no reasonable way to predict an outcome based on the small amount of information you have provided. Email transmissions to clients of this office presumably contain confidential and privileged material for the sole use of the intended recipient. The use, distribution, transmittal or re-transmittal by any unintended recipient of any communication is prohibited without our express approval in writing or by email.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/3/2012
    William L. Welch, III Attorney | William L. Welch, III
    While a person is free to speak or not speak to anyone, speaking to your opponent in litigation provides your opponent with the opportunity to use your own words against you as evidence. Regardless, you must appear in court for a jailable offense. The maximum for each of your charges should be on the papers that you are served with.
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 9/3/2012
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    In order to resolve a criminal offense you must appear in court. Whether you do jail depends on your record.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 9/3/2012
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    You must appear in court, but you may certainly enter into a dialogue with the prosecutor. You should have a lawyer for such serious charges. A conviction can mean a permanent record that can significantly impact future employment.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 9/3/2012
    Law Office of Kathryn L. Hudson
    Law Office of Kathryn L. Hudson | Kathryn L. Hudson
    It is never a good idea to represent yourself in a criminal matter, the prosecution's job is to exact the most punishment for the community as a deterrent. An attorney that practices criminal law in the court you are appearing will have a working relationship with the prosecuting attorney and be able to look at the specifics of your situation with the relevant law to get the best possible outcome, without this knowledge the lay person has a dangerous disadvantage.
    Answer Applies to: Arkansas
    Replied: 9/3/2012
    Ellman and Ellman PC
    Ellman and Ellman PC | Kevin Ellmann
    Considering these are Felony charges, you should definitely consult with an attorney. The likelihood of jail (or prison) depends on several factors including the strength of the State's case, your criminal history, and any other aggravating/mitigating factors. But a Felony is not something to tackle on your own.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 9/3/2012
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    It is remarkable that you would think you could just call the prosecutor and plead guilty without going to court. It is also hard to believe that you do not know that you are entitled to a public defender and that you are being charged with a felony that will require you to make many court appearances. What you do not know can hurt you in life and you must make good decisions and avoid trouble in life. Forgery, welfare fraud, worker's compensation fraud, Medicaid fraud, and other types of government theft crimes are taken very serious. They cost the taxpayers billions and prosecutors will almost always demand that you plead to a felony and pay restitution. That will make it very hard to get a decent job for the rest of your life and getting into school or government benefits can be effected as well. You will not be able to vote, own a gun, or travel to certain countries or get a visa. If you knew all of the consequences you might have acted differently, but it is too late now. If you are guilty and the evidence is sufficient you will have to plead to a felony and get 5 years probation. Unless you have a bad record most judges in large cities will not impose a jail sentence. Younger males commit almost all crimes and part of that is the fact that they are bad decision makers who act impulsively. They lack the proper morals and values that prevent others from doing anything they want to do and prevent them from committing crimes. They shoplift, drive drunk, get into fights, sell drugs without really considering what will happen when they eventuality get caught. Just like the 17 year old boy who stuck his head out of the top buss window and was killed, they do not think of what will happen if they break the rules. Women and older people do not take those risks or commit crimes because they are afraid of what will happen to them. They care about their future and their reputation. They are simply better decision makers since crime never pays and everybody gets caught sooner or later. I know you have learned your lesson, I just hope it is not too late. Retain a very good lawyer to try and avoid the felony conviction.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 9/3/2012
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