Can I change to a lower paying job after I file bankruptcy? 17 Answers as of June 14, 2011

My wife and I have been considering bankruptcy for about 2 years now. I have wanted to change professions for 5 years but I haven't been able to due to the amount of debt that we have. The new profession that I want to pursue pays 30K less than what I am making now. Therefore, if I file for bankruptcy will I have to keep my same job or can I go ahead an take the job making less money?

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Law Offices of Michael J. Berger
Law Offices of Michael J. Berger | Michael J. Berger
Yes, you can change to a lower paying job after you file bankruptcy. You can also change to a higher paying job. This is a decision that up to you. It is not regulated by bankruptcy law.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 6/14/2011
Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney
Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney | Janet Lawson
The key here is that your eligibility for Chapter 7 will depend on what you made in the 6 months prior to filing, and what you made in the previous 6 months will determine what you pay in Chapter 13. If you are going to switch jobs, do it 6 months before filing.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 6/10/2011
Diefer Law Group, P.C.
Diefer Law Group, P.C. | Abel Fernandez
If you file for bankruptcy, you can change jobs after that. There is nothing that states you cannot change your job after a bankruptcy.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 6/10/2011
Law Office of Maureen O' Malley
Law Office of Maureen O' Malley | Maureen O'Malley
Yes. Assuming you're talking about filing for Ch. 7.
Answer Applies to: Virginia
Replied: 6/10/2011
Law Offices of Joseph A. Mannis
Law Offices of Joseph A. Mannis | Todd Mannis
You can take whatever job you want, whenever you want. Bankruptcy does not make you an indentured servant.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 6/10/2011
    Brian Walker Law Firm, P.C.
    Brian Walker Law Firm, P.C. | Brian Walker
    Of course you can always change careers after filing bankruptcy. The bankruptcy court has no authority to tell you what type of employment to have. However, if you file a Chapter 13, it will be based upon the feasibility of the plan you put together which is closely linked to your income level. On the other hand, if you file a Chapter 7, only your income at the time of filing will be considered. If you have any further questions feel free to contact me.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 6/10/2011
    The Law Office of Mark J. Markus
    The Law Office of Mark J. Markus | Mark Markus
    Well, you can always change to a lower paying job since no one is required to work. However, depending on what chapter of bankruptcy you filed, it may or may not affect your case. For example, if you filed a Chapter 13 case, depending on what your Plan proposes and what debts need to be paid, reducing your income may leave you unable to complete your plan and may make it impossible to modify. There's no way to know without examining all the specifics of your situation.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Bankruptcy Law office of Bill Rubendall
    Bankruptcy Law office of Bill Rubendall | William M. Rubendall
    You can change jobs before, during or after bankruptcy.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Financial Relief Law Center
    Financial Relief Law Center | Mark Alonso
    You can change jobs anytime and in some cases a lower paying job would be beneficial for the mean test and discharging the debts in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Carballo Law Offices
    Carballo Law Offices | Tony E. Carballo
    You are free to do whatever you want after filing for bankruptcy.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Ashman Law Office
    Ashman Law Office | Glen Edward Ashman
    This is an issue you have to discuss with your bankruptcy lawyer before filing. In a Chapter 13 the job change could result in an objection for bad faith. In some Chapter 7s there also could be an objection; in others it may be fine.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Daniel Hoarfrost, Attorney at Law
    Daniel Hoarfrost, Attorney at Law | Daniel Hoarfrost
    If you qualify for a Ch 7, then after you file and your debts are discharged, you are free to live your life any way you see fit.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Bird & VanDyke, Inc.
    Bird & VanDyke, Inc. | David VanDyke
    If you file a chapter 7 you can change jobs and make less income. If you intend to file a ch 13 making less income after having your plan confirmed at the higher income would create problems.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Law Office of L. Paul Zahn
    Law Office of L. Paul Zahn | Paul Zahn
    If you are filing for chapter 7 bankruptcy, then it doesn't matter whether or not you change jobs, as you won't be put on a payment plan. Your income will determine whether or not you may wish to remain liable for some debts you would otherwise want to keep, such as car loans or mortgages. If you are in my area and are looking for an attorney, please contact me for a free consultation.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Uriarte & Wood, Attorneys at Law
    Uriarte & Wood, Attorneys at Law | Robert G. Uriarte
    IF you file a chapter 7 you can take another job. If you filed a chapter 13 and your current income is funding your plan, you will need to amend your plan.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Greifendorff Law Offices, PC
    Greifendorff Law Offices, PC | Christine Wilton
    So long as you're not changing jobs to avoid paying your debts; intent to defraud your creditors. Otherwise, there is no law that would stop you from changing jobs.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/9/2011
    Ursula G. Barrios Law
    Ursula G. Barrios Law | Guillermo Machado
    Of course you can. You can earn as much as you want.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 6/9/2011
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