Can I benefit from diversion if I got a DUI in another state and have an out of state license? 4 Answers as of June 10, 2011

If I had a DUI in another state, can I still benefit from "diversion" in Oregon? I still have an out of state license.

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Harris Law Firm
Harris Law Firm | Jennifer C. Robins
No, the Oregon diversion program is only for DUII cases that occur in Oregon. If the DUII charge is from another state, you cannot enter diversion in Oregon.
Answer Applies to: Oregon
Replied: 6/10/2011
Law Office of Jonathan T. Sarre
Law Office of Jonathan T. Sarre | Jonathan T. Sarre
The best thing I can say to answer your question (especially since I don't know what state the other state is), if you comply with whatever the other state wants you to do, you won't have a conviction or whatever it is they were going to do to you in the other state. Plus if you do get convicted in the other state, that state will most likely suspend your driver's license. Then if you go to the DMV in Oregon to get a license here, Oregon will not give you a license because they are a party to something called the "Interstate Compact on License Suspensions." This means basically if one state suspends your license for a DUII conviction then all the states are supposed to. I've walked many people from other states through Oregon's diversion process and I'm sure you can do treatment in Oregon to satisfy the other state's requirements. I'm not sure what real benefit you will get here but it should help you with the other state.
Answer Applies to: Oregon
Replied: 6/9/2011
Howard W. Collins, Attorney at Law
Howard W. Collins, Attorney at Law | Howard W. Collins
In Oregon you are required to have a clear period of either 10 or 15 years without any other diversion or DUI in this or any other state.
Answer Applies to: Oregon
Replied: 6/8/2011
Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC
Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC | Rankin Johnson IV
If your DUI would disqualify you if it happened in Oregon, then no. If it wouldn't (more than ten years old, for instance) then you can still do diversion.
Answer Applies to: Oregon
Replied: 6/8/2011
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