Can I be served with someone else's papers? 5 Answers as of February 09, 2012

I just got served papers for my mother in law. She doesn't live here and someone dropped them off claiming she can serve them to me. I don't know what they are actually for, I haven't opened it. Can I be served with her papers?

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Elizabeth Jones, A Professional Corporation
Elizabeth Jones, A Professional Corporation | Elizabeth Jones
No. You cannot be served on behalf of another person unless you are designated to receive service.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/9/2012
Law Offices of Frances Headley | Frances Headley
If your mother in law has never lived with you then you cannot be served with her documents. She should consult an attorney about how best to contest the lack of service on her.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/8/2012
Diefer Law Group, P.C.
Diefer Law Group, P.C. | Abel Fernandez
They are not serving you. They are substitute serving her. If she lives there, they can give the documents to any person in the residence over the age of 18.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/8/2012
Warner Center Law Offices of Donald F. Conviser
Warner Center Law Offices of Donald F. Conviser | Donald F. Conviser
The service that was made was not proper, but you should promptly communicate with your mother-in-law to advise her that the documents were served on you, and you should promptly provide those documents to your mother-in-law so that she may seek legal advice and assistance dealing with not only the improper service, but also the case. It is possible that the party who had you served either believed that your mother-in-law is living with you, or is claiming that your mother-in-law is living with you - and were your mother-in-law living with you, substitute service could be made. If your mother-in-law does nothing about the improper service, the plaintiff in that case could possibly get a judgment against her (whether correctly or not), so she should seek and obtain legal advice about how to deal with the case and service without delay.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/8/2012
Michael Apicella
Michael Apicella | Apicella Law and Mediation
Given the limited info you provided in your question, it does not sound like proper "personal" service. Rather, it sounds like the person who caused service is attempting "substituted" service, which can be proper depending on the circumstances, such as if you are the guardian or conservator of your mother-in-law. If your only relationship is that of son-in-law, then you should notify the person who caused service that his/her process server served the wrong person.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/8/2012
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