Can I be a citizen after being here ten years? 3 Answers as of June 29, 2011

Please I heard about the law for ten year immigration. What about this is true? Can I apply I have been here for more than ten years.

Ask a Local Attorney. 100% Anonymous. Free Answers.

Free Case Evaluation by a Local Lawyer: Click here
Law Office of J Thomas Smith
Law Office of J Thomas Smith | J. Thomas Smith Ph.D.
Generally, you cannot become a U.S. citizen unless you have been a lawful permanent U.S. resident for at least five years, three years if you are married to AND LIVING WITH a U.S. citizen for three years. You may submit you application 90 days before your required years of permanent residence is reached. However, there are a few NARROW exceptions, such as a battered spouse; refugee or political asylee; U.S. military personnel or a military widow or widower; or spouse of a U.S. citizen in certain overseas jobs. Consult an experienced experienced immigration attorney for assistance. The "ten year immigration" you are talking about is "Cancellation of Removal." This defense is often used in removal/deportation proceedings. However, it is much more complex than simply being in the country for 10 years or more. Consult an experienced experienced immigration attorney for assistance.
Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 6/29/2011
Law Office of Christine Troy
Law Office of Christine Troy | Christine Troy
To become a USC, you first need to have a green card. It sounds like you are talking about one of the old amnesty programs, but I am not sure. You would need to consult with a competent immigration attorney as they will need a lot more facts about your case in order to analyze it for you.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 6/28/2011
Law Office of Immigration & International Trade Law
Law Office of Immigration & International Trade Law | Linda Liang
If you have been here for 10 years illegally, then you will be illegal. Exception depends on your circumstances. You should talk to a lawyer for her or him to assess your case. You are more than welcome to contact our firm too. Good luck!
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 6/28/2011
Click to View More Answers: