Can I be charged with murder and robbery just because a friend is saying I was involved? 8 Answers as of May 30, 2013

If a friend of mine is involved in a murder and robbery and he eventually says that I was involved years later while he already tried to put this case on another person who has been dismissed on the case. Can I be charged with murder and robbery just because he is saying I was involved?

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Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC
Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC | Jacob Peter Sartz IV
It depends on the credibility of this individual, the other evidence available, if any, and a litany of other factors. The police and prosecutor's office generally are very careful before they pursue such serious charges. If the individual making the accusations has a lengthy criminal history, especially if they have prior convictions for crimes of dishonesty on their record, they would not be a great witness and could make it very challenging to proceed. However, as with anything, it's a question of the proofs and the other evidence they may have. Murder charges are rarely brought just based on the testimony of a, single, witness or alleged co-conspirator, especially if that one individual has a lengthy criminal history. Obviously, what you say and do can and will be used against you if they ever do investigate you for those charges, so I'd advise you to privately consult with a defense attorney. The police may wish to talk to you at some point because of the allegations. Rather than risk incriminating yourself, you should strongly consider retaining a lawyer just in case.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 2/22/2012
Craig W. Elhart, P.C.
Craig W. Elhart, P.C. | Craig Elhart
The decision to charge someone with a crime rests with the prosecuting attorney. There would have to be some evidence of your involvement prior to the prosecutor charging you.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 2/20/2012
Rudolph A. Serra, Attorney
Rudolph A. Serra, Attorney | Rudolph A. Serra
In order to be charged with a crime, the prosecutor only needs "probable cause." The prosecutor does NOT need "proof beyond a reasonable doubt" to charge you. Having a witness or informant against you is often all that is required for probable cause. So the answer is "yes." One person willing to lie can get you charged with a crime.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 2/20/2012
J.W.Poprawa, Attorney at Law | Joseph W. Poprawa
No.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 5/30/2013
Michael Breczinski
Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
First he is NOT your friend. He is willing to let you go to prison for life. Second if the police believe him, yes you could be charged. Do not talk to the police and get and attorney.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 2/17/2012
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law
    Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law | Thomas J. Tomko
    Yes, you can be charged. Do not post anything about this matter on a web-site and hire an attorney immediately to represent you. Failure to do so will have possible bad consequences.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 2/17/2012
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC | Timothy J. Klisz
    Likely that would not be enough to be investigated by the police. But, if they find other evidence, then charges would likely follow.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 2/17/2012
    The DeRose Lawfirm | Peter J. DeRose
    You can always "be charged." What you need is an experienced defense lawyer working with your prosecutor to avoid charges in the first place. If you have an alibi, it should be presented now. If you are willing to take a polygraph, you should do so now. This advice is premised on the fact that you did not commit a crime.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 2/17/2012
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