Can I be charged as an accessory to a homicide if my car was involved but I didn't know anything about the homicide? 13 Answers as of March 24, 2013

I am the owner of the car and I am the only one being charged on this case.

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Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
I would need further information to answer. You should hire an attorney and disclose all the facts and circumstances.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 3/24/2013
Lawrence Lewis
Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
You can be charged, especially IF the perpetrator explains that you provided the vehicle and/or gun with full knowledge of what would occur.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 3/21/2013
William L. Welch, III Attorney | William L. Welch, III
Yes, anyone might be charged with a crime, regardless of whether he or she has in fact broken the law. In a conspiracy each conspirator does not have to know precisely what the other conspirators do, in order for all conspirators to be convicted. In addition the law of conspiracy holds each conspirator responsible for the actions of the other co-conspirators. An attorney can assist you with evaluating the prosecution's case, any defenses that you might have, and any plea offer that might be made, so that you can decide whether to plea bargain or go to trial. If you were to be found guilty, then an attorney can assist you with presenting mitigation, allocution, and a recommendation for a more lenient sentence. and a recommendation for a more lenient sentence. Consider seeking a confidential consultation with an experienced criminal defense attorney. Beware that online posts are not confidential. If somehow the prosecution were to find your post, then it might be used in evidence against you.
Answer Applies to: Maryland
Replied: 3/21/2013
Michael Breczinski
Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
Well just because your car was involved does not mean that you were involved. They will have to prove that you had something to do with it. Get a lawyer. Make no statements to the police.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 3/21/2013
The Law Offices of John J. Carney Esq.
The Law Offices of John J. Carney Esq. | John J. Carney
You have not given any facts of the case, but if you were charged you should retain a good criminal lawyer and not talk to the police. If you already gave a statement to the police that was a very big mistake.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 3/21/2013
    Connell-Savela
    Connell-Savela | Jason Savela
    knowledge of the crime is always an element in accessory charges accessory is usually after the fact and means that you help perpetrators after they commit crime avoid detection, get away, or in some other way if you know a crime will be committed and you loan a car to commit it, then you are getting close to complicity - meaning that you aid or help with the intent for the crime to be completed I would get an attorney to help you decide how to talk with police about this, to make sure you do not make a mistake and get yourself in trouble. The police want information and you may have some. They want to catch the shooters, but they will threaten you and if they think you are lying, prosecute you. you do not have to talk to police, but you are not allowed to lie.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 3/21/2013
    Charles M. Schiff, Attorney at Law
    Charles M. Schiff, Attorney at Law | Charles M. Schiff
    You can be charged if there exists probable cause to believe that you were involved. Whether the state can prove your involvement beyond a reasonable doubt is another question entirely.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 3/21/2013
    Timothy J. Thill P.C.
    Timothy J. Thill P.C. | Timothy J. Thill
    You are probably the only one being charged because you will not tell the police WHO borrowed your car, and how to locate the fellow.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 3/21/2013
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    Yes you can, and you did. Time to shop for a lawyer my friend.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/21/2013
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC | John F Brennan
    Clearly you can be charged. The real question is can you be convicted. Call for an appointment.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 3/21/2013
    Law Office of Hieu Vu
    Law Office of Hieu Vu | Hieu N Vu
    They can charge you all they want. It's up to them to prove it. Keep your mouth shut in the meantime and don't say anything to any officer. They are not there to help you. It's probably too late, but don't say anything additional. It can only make things worse.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/21/2013
    Toivonen Law Office | John Toivonen
    You can be charged as an accessory. But is this a strong case for the prosecution? That all depends on the facts. One thing is sure, you had better hire an attorney as soon as possible. If convicted of conspiracy to commit murder, you could serve a life sentence.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 3/20/2013
    Law Office of James Gandy
    Law Office of James Gandy | James Gandy
    Yes. A person can be charged with a crime based upon weak evidence because being charged with a crime is different than being convicted. To charge someone, the prosecution only has to demonstrate probable cause - that something is more likely than not; the chances of it happening are only 51% or better. To convict, the prosecution must demonstrate that the person is guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 3/20/2013
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