Can I be arrested if someone reports me to the police for solicitation and prostiution? 54 Answers as of May 31, 2013

I got an email saying "You have been reported to the police for prostitution and solicitation". Can I be arrested at home or at work for this?

Ask a Local Attorney. 100% Anonymous. Free Answers.

Free Case Evaluation by a Local Lawyer: Click here
Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider
Law Office of Peter F. Goldscheider | Peter Goldscheider
The police don't communicate by email. You are probably being scammed. If you really want to know if there is a warrant out for your arrest, you should contact the records division of the police department in the city where you live and ask them.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 12/19/2011
Law Office of William L Spern | William Spern
Police and more importantly the prosecutor will general require more evidence than a mere report of a crime.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 12/12/2011
Law Offices of Martina A. Vigil, PC
Law Offices of Martina A. Vigil, PC | Martina A. Vigil
You can be arrested anywhere. Likely, you will get a letter from the District Attorney's Office stating that charges have been filed against you. Do not speak to any law enforcement regarding this matter and invoke you right to an attorney.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 12/12/2011
Law Office of Phillip Weiser
Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
Not usually unless the police actually catch you committing the criminal acts.
Answer Applies to: Kansas
Replied: 12/7/2011
Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
Yes you could.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 12/7/2011
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    These charges must be committed in the presence of a police officer. If you were to be arrested I would think you would be arrested on the spot.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 12/7/2011
    Myles Hahn III Attorney at Law | Myles Hahn III
    In theory, yes you can. If a police officer or a private citizen presents a case to the State's Attorney or to the Court, then a judge has authority to issue an arrest warrant. You can then be arrested anywhere a police officer finds you. You may want to look into confirming the source of the e-mail. Talk to an attorney in person and discuss what you know.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 12/6/2011
    Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC
    Cornish, Crowley, Rockafellow, & Sartz, PLLC | Jacob Peter Sartz IV
    If the police believe there is enough evidence and if the Prosecuting attorney believes in good faith that there is a case, they may request a warrant for your arrest. I would recommend you retain a lawyer.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 12/6/2011
    Law Firm of Martin & Wallentine
    Law Firm of Martin & Wallentine | Jerry Lee Wallentine Jr.
    They require probable cause to make an arrest. It may lead to questioning or surveillance, but I would be surprised if a mere allegation, without more, would lead to an arrest.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 12/6/2011
    Jules N. Fiani, Attorney at Law
    Jules N. Fiani, Attorney at Law | Jules Fiani
    No.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 5/31/2013
    The Law Office of Cindy Barton
    The Law Office of Cindy Barton | Cindy Barton
    This sounds like a gag, but not a very funny one. If someone called the police and filed a report, the police may come and speak to you. However, if you didn't do anything illegal, you should simply tell the police that. It might be a good idea to be careful of who your friends are, and to be careful to be around real friends that could always honestly say, "no, she could not have done that, she was right here.
    Answer Applies to: Utah
    Replied: 12/6/2011
    Meyer & Kiss, LLC | Daniel Kiss
    You could be, but it's unlikely unless the police have some more information to confirm an anonymous report. The police need "probable cause" to make an arrest.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Palumbo and Kosofsky
    Palumbo and Kosofsky | Michael Palumbo
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 5/31/2013
    Law Office of Ronald Aronds, LLC
    Law Office of Ronald Aronds, LLC | Ronald Aronds
    If the police feel that they have probable cause to arrest you then they can arrest any time or place that they want.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Fagan, Fagan & Davis
    Fagan, Fagan & Davis | Steven H. Fagan
    Yes, you can be arrested if the police or prosecution have probable cause to believe you have committed a criminal offense. However, the use of email here makes the legitimacy of the communication suspect. If you believe there is a warrant, check with the county clerk of court.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Betts Legal Services
    Betts Legal Services | Shawn M. Betts
    It is unlikely without more evidence such as an audio or videotape. Potentially the State could attempt to charge you, but you will probably just be issued a summons to appear in court.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Law Office of Michael E. Hendrickson
    Law Office of Michael E. Hendrickson | Michael E. Hendrickson
    Yes, it's possible if your accuser goes down to the police station or magistrate's office and swears out a warrant for your arrest.
    Answer Applies to: Virginia
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Fitzpatrick, Mariano, & Santos, PC
    Fitzpatrick, Mariano, & Santos, PC | Raymond J. Savoy
    The police will attempt to contact you if there is an active investigation. It wouold be highly unusual for the police to conduct an investigation of this type without contacting you for a statement.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Law Office of James A Schoenberger
    Law Office of James A Schoenberger | James A Schoenberger
    Not likely. In Washington, citizen reports do not lead to arrest without independent corroboration of a crime by law enforcement.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Thomas C. Brandstrader Attorney At Law | Thomas C. Brandstrader
    You can be arrested upon a signed complaint but other than the person you allegedly solicited I am not sure who would sign the complaint. Who was the email from?
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Rudolph A. Serra, Attorney
    Rudolph A. Serra, Attorney | Rudolph A. Serra
    You can be arrested anytime for anything. The question is whether the arrest is valid. A valid arrest generally requires "probable cause." If you were accused of a felony, reports from others would provide that probable cause but when accused of a misdemeanor {such as prostitution] the law generally requires that the officer witness some illegal act. An accusation probably provides a reason to an investigation but unless the investigation provides some evidence not much more may happen.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Michael Breczinski
    Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
    That person would have to go in front of a judge ans swear to facts that the judge would consider enough to issue a warrant. You should NOT go to the police and say anything. They are hoping you will come in and confess.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Harrison & Harrison
    Harrison & Harrison | Samuel Harrison
    I wouldn't worry too much about it. They would need more than a statement from an unknown informer to make an arrest.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Gutin and Wolverton
    Gutin and Wolverton | Harley Gutin
    Unlikely that you would be arrested for a misdemeanor (you should not be) but law enforcement if they have enough evidence can file charges and you would receive a notice to appear. Typically the only evidence in these cases is from the undercover officer being solicited.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Law Office of James S. Lochead
    Law Office of James S. Lochead | James S. Lochead
    No, you must be apprehended carrying out or attempting to carry out the act before you can be arrested.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Law Office of Kathryn L. Hudson
    Law Office of Kathryn L. Hudson | Kathryn L. Hudson
    To be arrested for a crime there has to be some proof that a crime was committed. Solicitation and prostitution are crimes that must be witnessed, if you have not engaged in either activity you have nothing to worry about because it could not be proven.
    Answer Applies to: Arkansas
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC
    Law Office of Rankin Johnson IV, LLC | Rankin Johnson IV
    Yes, but you probably won't be. A report that you committed a crime, if it's from a credible source, is a basis to arrest you. But it's more likely the police want to talk to you. You should refuse to talk to them if they try, and, if they persist, talk to a lawyer. You do not have to respond to letters or phone calls from the police. If the police have a basis to arrest you and want to do so, there isn't anything you can do to avoid it except hope they don't find you or turn yourself in. You should talk to a lawyer before doing either.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    The Law Offices of Robert L. Driessen
    The Law Offices of Robert L. Driessen | Robert L. Driessen
    Well if there is enough evidence to convict you perhaps. However if you really were to get arrested for such a crime you would be contacted by the police not an email.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    Possibly, but you can help yourself by speaking to no one but your lawyer about this. Once you begin opening your mouth and incriminating yourself, everything goes south.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C.
    Craig W. Elhart, P.C. | Craig Elhart
    The short answer is yes, but probably only after the matter has been reviewed the prosecuting attorney and charges have been filed an a warrant for your arrest authorized.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Reeves Law Firm, P.C.
    Reeves Law Firm, P.C. | Roy L. Reeves
    I have never heard of cops using e-mail, so I suspect you are getting a joke or spam e-mail but cannot say one way or the other.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Austin Legal Services, PLC
    Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
    Who was the email from? That almost sounds like a scam to me because I don't know who would contact you via email for such a matter. I could be wrong but that doesn't sound legitimate to me. You can always contact the police directly to check on the validity of any investigation or charges. Chances are if you are charged or cited with anything, you will find out through the mail or the police will show up with a warrant.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Baner and Baner
    Baner and Baner | Jonathan Baner
    You can be arrested wherever your are found with very few limits. Sorry, but it's true. If it occurs you'll want a top notch attorney such as myself (*smiles*). Unfortunate, but true.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Lewin & Lewin | Robert D. Lewin
    In Massachusetts, prostitution and solicitation are misdemeanors. In Massachusetts, in regard to misdemeanors, in the absence of a warrant and in the absence of some specific statutory authority, a police officer can arrest only if, (1) the misdemeanor is committed in his presence and, (2) it involves a breach of the peace, and (3) is still continuing at the time of the arrest. In the situation you present the alleged crime occurred sometime in the past and therefore a warrantless arrest - either at your home or work or anywhere else - would not be permitted. If the police went to the Courthouse and got a warrant for your arrest then you could be arrested. In the situation you present it seems unlikely that a clerk-magistrate at the Court would issue a warrant for your arrest. More likely the case may be set up for a hearing before a clerk-magistrate to determine whether a criminal complaint would be issued against you. You would receive a notice of that hearing in the mail - assuming the police have a correct mailing address for you. In the alternative if the Clerk-Magistrate did issue a criminal complaint against you without a hearing then it is most likely that you would be summonsed into court (as opposed to being arrested).
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Law Offices of Ramona Hallam
    Law Offices of Ramona Hallam | Ramona Hallam
    I get emails all of the time telling me that I am the rightful heir to the throne. An email notification does not mean the person writing is telling the truth. If you are contacted by police, make sure you do not make any statements to them or answer any questions. Just tell the police that you want to speak to an attorney, and that you want to remain silent. After that, do not speak. If they tell you they want to help you and just want your side of the story to clear things up, do not tell them anything! If they are going to arrest you, they will either do so because you incriminate yourself, or they will do so because they already have a case.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Law Office of Jared Altman
    Law Office of Jared Altman | Jared Altman
    Yes. But it sounds like bologna to me.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    If you are a prostitute or have been using prostitutes you may be arrested, but the police will need to have sufficient proof to get an arrest warrant. If they contact you call an attorney. Do not talk to the police no matter what the promise or threaten. If they arrest you it is up to you to ask for the questioning to stop, demand an attorney, and not say anything more than your name and address. Look confident, assured, and innocent. They will secretly think you are much smarter than most of the other criminals who foolishly confessed or made incriminating admissions that made it all but impossible for their lawyer to negotiate a good plea deal or win the trial. Remember, Fish only get caught when they open their mouth.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Fabian & Associates, Inc.
    Fabian & Associates, Inc. | Stephen G. Fabian, Jr.
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: Oklahoma
    Replied: 5/31/2013
    Law Office of Christopher G Humphrey PC | Christopher G Humphrey
    It's possible, but you will probably get a ticket. Depends on the information they have. Depends if it is a felony level solicitation, or just an offer to exchange sex for money. Solicitation to Commit a Felony: 6-1-302.Solicitation to commit felony; renunciation of criminal intention. (a)A person is guilty of solicitation to commit a felony if, with intent that a felony be committed, he commands, encourages or facilitates the commission of that crime under circumstances strongly corroborative of the intention that the crime be committed but the solicited crime is not attempted or committed. (b)A person is not liable under this section if, after soliciting another person to commit a crime, he persuaded the other person not to do so or otherwise prevented the commission of the crime, under circumstances manifesting a voluntary and complete renunciation of his criminal intention. 6-4-103.Promoting prostitution; penalties. (a)A person commits a felony if he: (i)Knowingly or intentionally entices or compels another person to become a prostitute; (ii)Knowingly or intentionally procures, or offers or agrees to procure, a person for another person for the purpose of prostitution; (iii)Having control over the use of a place, knowingly or intentionally permits another person to use the place for prostitution; or (iv)Receives money or other property from a prostitute, without lawful consideration, knowing it was earned in whole or in part from prostitution. (b)The felony defined by this section is punishable by imprisonment for not more than three (3) years, a fine of not more than three thousand dollars ($3,000.00), or both. However, the crime is a felony punishable by imprisonment for not more than five (5) years, a fine of not more than five thousand dollars ($5,000.00), or both, under paragraph (i) of subsection (a) of this section if the person enticed or compelled is under eighteen (18) years of age. 6-4-102.soliciting an act of prostitution; penalties. A person is guilty of soliciting an act of prostitution if, with the intent that an act of sexual intrusion as defined by W.S. 6-2-301(a)(vii) be committed, that person knowingly or intentionally pays, or offers or agrees to pay money or other property to another person under circumstances strongly corroborative of the intention that an act of prostitution be committed. Soliciting an act of prostitution is a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not more than six (6) months, a fine of not more than seven hundred fifty dollars ($750.00), or both. most misdemeanors people receive a citation. Plead the fifth and sign the ticket and fight it in Court. Those who don't talk, may walk. Get an attorney.
    Answer Applies to: Wyoming
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    The police need more than one person saying you were soliciting before they will make an arrest. If they have the evidence they need then they will send you or call you and ask you to come in and talk. If they do this have an attorney with you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC | Timothy J. Klisz
    If the police have evidence to show this and obtain an arrest warrant, then yes, they can arrest you anywhere.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Attorney at Law
    Attorney at Law | Michael J. Kennedy
    Sounds like spam hoax to me.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Hammerschmidt Broughton Law
    Hammerschmidt Broughton Law | Mark A. Broughton
    Probably not. Curious as to who sent this email. Are you sure it is not a virus or a scam? I've never heard of this before, at least from law enforcement - an email warning. Is there a reason this troubles you? That is to say, is there any truth to it? (don't answer on a public forum or Internet) If it's legit, at the moment they are just trying to frighten or warn you. They usually make arrests as the solicitation or act of prostitution is taking place, most often by the use of "John's" or undercover cops. If they were going to arrest you I suspect they would have already done so.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Dunnings Law Firm
    Dunnings Law Firm | Steven Dunnings
    You need to stop using the web, or change the people you associate with.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Harden Law Offices
    Harden Law Offices | Leonard D. Harden
    Yes you can be arrested at either. It may also just be a scare tactic, so my opinion is to live life normally and of course not commit any crimes. If you are arrested say nothing and ask to contact a lawyer ASAP. There is nothing you will say that will help, let criminal defense lawyer help.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Law Office of Thomas J. Ogas
    Law Office of Thomas J. Ogas | Thomas Ogas
    You can only be arrested if the police can prove it is true. A report is not enough. The police need to either see it themselves or confirm it with several witnesses. And its not likely a serious enough crime that the police will go to the trouble of tracking down and interviewing multiple witnesses, writing reports, and then filing for an arrest warrant. Its most likely someone trying to scare you.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    The Law Office of Harry E. Hudson, Jr. | Harry E. Hudson, Jr.
    Probably not. You might also want to change your e-mail address to prevent what appears to be harassment.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Beaulier Law Office
    Beaulier Law Office | Maury Beaulier
    The answer would depend on what evidence is available to support the charge. It seems unlikely that the statement of a potential witness alone would support a criminal charge without some supplementary proof.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    It is unlikely that the police would send you an email about something like that. There are a lot of phishing scams that pop up in our email accounts looking for money or personal information. If you actually offered to have sex with someone for money, you will get a summons in the mail directing you to appear in a specific court, at a specific time and on a specific date. If not, I wouldn't worry about it.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S.
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S. | Steve Freeborn
    Sure. If the facts and evidence show that you have engaged in such activity.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Mark Thiessen, Attorney at Law
    Mark Thiessen, Attorney at Law | Mark Thiessen
    The police don't send emails. Ever. They just arrest you or call you to come in and "talk".
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Law Office of James E. Smith
    Law Office of James E. Smith | James Smith
    Unless you have a previous record or are on probation or some legal restriction you will probably just get a citation or summons to appear at court.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 12/5/2011
    Rizio & Nelson
    Rizio & Nelson | John W. Bussman
    I have no idea what kind of evidence the police would rely upon to try to get an arrest warrant. It seems unlikely that detectives would invest much time or energy in pursuing such a petty misdemeanor unless you were actually observed by police committing the crime. I wouldn't lose much sleep over it if I were you. Even if you were charged with a crime somehow, this is usually the kind of thing that would only involve a citation. They don't typically take people into custody for petty misdemeanors like this.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 12/5/2011
Click to View More Answers:
12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Free Legal QuestionsConnect with a local attorney