Can the homeowner asks us to vacate the property earlier than the date on the lease? 17 Answers as of January 16, 2013

We signed a one-year rental lease October 1 2012. The homeowner told us the other day we had until March 1 2013 to move out does he have the right to do this?

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Law Offices of Mark West
Law Offices of Mark West | Mark West
If you are in compliance with your obligations under the lease (i.e. up to date with the rent) the landlord would be in breach if he tries to evict you earlier than the lease. He also cannot just say leave, he has to go through proper procedures.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/16/2013
Sultan Law Office | Gregory Sultan
He can tell you what ever he wants. But unless the lease has a provision for early termination and you have not otherwise violated the lease, you don't need to leave.
Answer Applies to: Illinois
Replied: 1/10/2013
Ken Love Law | Kenneth Love
If you violated the lease, yes. Otherwise no he does not. He will have to go to Court to evict you and will not be entitled to without good cause. Keep in mind he will ask you to leave in October and will win then.
Answer Applies to: North Carolina
Replied: 1/10/2013
Law Offices of Frances Headley | Frances Headley
No, unless the lease provides for early termination, under certain conditions such as breach of the conditions of the lease.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/7/2013
Law Office of Peter Holzer | Peter Holzer
Did you pay the rent? I'm assuming that you did. Did the landlord lose the property in a foreclosure sale? If so, he/she no longer has a say in what happens with the property. Here?s the *bottom line*: if you have performed under the lease, the landlord can't cut short your time.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 1/7/2013
    Universal Law Group, Inc. | Francis John Cowhig
    Not unless there are unusual circumstances. I strongly suggest that you contact an experienced landlord/tenant attorney for a face-to-face consultation and give him/her all of the facts surrounding your situation. He/she would then be in a better position to analyze your case and advise you of your options.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/7/2013
    Law Offices of John F. Nicholson
    Law Offices of John F. Nicholson | John F. Nicholson
    No. Not unless the homeowner is going to claim you breached the lease and are subject to court action for unlawful detainer - an eviction proceeding.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/7/2013
    Law Offices of George H. Shers | George H. Shers
    No, unless you broke some part of the Lease, it is a binding contract and you are entitled to stay there for a year. What reason has he given? There may be a clause in the Lease for attorney fees to the prevailing party.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/7/2013
    Zales Law Office
    Zales Law Office | Nicholas C Zales
    No. That would be a breach of your lease. Get yourself an attorney ASAP to assist you.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 1/7/2013
    Victor Varga | Victor Varga
    No
    Answer Applies to: Maryland
    Replied: 1/7/2013
    Law Offices of Frank D. Granato
    Law Offices of Frank D. Granato | Frank Granato
    No. you have rights.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/7/2013
    The Davies Law Firm, P.A.
    The Davies Law Firm, P.A. | Robert F. Davies, Esq.
    in most situations, no. however, you need some legal advice. please call a lawyer near you.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 1/7/2013
    Heinly, Benson, Killian & Kramer, An Association of Attorneys Not a Partnership
    Heinly, Benson, Killian & Kramer, An Association of Attorneys Not a Partnership | Valerie L Kramer
    Assuming that you have done nothing to breach the lease, the Landlord can not legally force you to move before the end of the one year lease term. That?s one of the benefits of signing a year lease rather than a month to month agreement. If you are able to move, though, you might want to consider looking for another place and ask the landlord to pay for your moving expenses and something for your trouble, since it?s likely that the landlord would be unwilling to extend your lease beyond the original year. That way, you might both come out ahead.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 1/7/2013
    Greenbaum, Nagel, Fisher & Paliotti LLP | Stephen A. Greenbaum
    Noyour lease is a legal guaranty that so long as you do not breach it you can remain there until the expiration.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 1/7/2013
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC | John F Brennan
    Not if you are timely paying the lease.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 1/7/2013
    Peters Law, PLLC
    Peters Law, PLLC | Mark T. Peters, Sr.
    He can ask. However, if you are current in your rent and the lease does not give him the right to terminate early and you have not violated any other provision of the lease, then you can tell him that you are staying for your entire lease term. He will have a hard time evicting you since you have the right to quiet possession during the lease term.
    Answer Applies to: Idaho
    Replied: 1/7/2013
    Winnick Ruben Hoffnung Peabody & Mendel, LLC | Daniel N. Hoffnung
    Probably not, unless you have breached the lease in some way In ay case, the Landlord must go through a Court procedure to legally evict you.
    Answer Applies to: Connecticut
    Replied: 1/7/2013
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