Can a defendant bring his own interpreter on court day? 54 Answers as of April 08, 2014

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EDWARD P RUSSELL | EDWARD P RUSSELL
In bankruptcy court it is required that a court appointed interpreter be appointed. It is done through a telephonic hookup.
Answer Applies to: Minnesota
Replied: 4/8/2014
Lawrence Lewis
Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
Yes, if the person is state certified.
Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 4/7/2014
Ronald K. Nims LLC | Ronald K. Nims
Because the court and the prosecution might be dubious about the integrity of an interpreter who just appears unannounced at the time of the trial. If you need an interpreter, you should inform the prosecution and the court beforehand and an interpreter will be appointed.
Answer Applies to: Ohio
Replied: 4/4/2014
GARCIA & GONZALES, P.C.
GARCIA & GONZALES, P.C. | Richard N. Gonzales
Most Trustee will not allow you to bring your own interpreter. You should call the Trustee prior to the Creditors' Meeting and ask them for permission. Most Trustees use a telephonic interpreter service.
Answer Applies to: Colorado
Replied: 4/4/2014
Michael Breczinski
Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
Yes as long as the person is accepted by the court. They usually are.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 4/4/2014
    Mark S. Hubert PC
    Mark S. Hubert PC | Mark Hubert
    No - the court interpreter must be court certified to interpret in that language but perhaps in conjunction with a proper court certified interpreter the judge would let him help. In criminal actions thew defendants get an interpreter provided free of charge.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 4/3/2014
    Pius Joseph A Professional Law Corp. | Pius Joseph
    In a civil case you must and in a criminal case the court provides an interpreter but you can have your own interpreter to observe the interpretation.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/3/2014
    Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney
    Janet A. Lawson Bankruptcy Attorney | Janet Lawson
    They have one on the phone.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/3/2014
    Provda Law Firm
    Provda Law Firm | Bruce Provda
    You can bring an interpreter. The court may ask for a court certified interpreter to be present too if yours is not.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 4/3/2014
    Peters Law, PLLC
    Peters Law, PLLC | Mark T. Peters, Sr.
    He can, but the court will not allow the interpreter to speak, unless the interpreter is certified for court hearings.
    Answer Applies to: Idaho
    Replied: 4/3/2014
    WILLIAM L SANDERS, ATTORNEY AT LAW | William L. Sanders
    That would be in the discretion of the Judge. Most courts prefer to provide their own interpreters. You should go ask the clerk of court or the judge's law clerk. Do not wait till day of trial.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 4/3/2014
    Gregory M Janks, PC
    Gregory M Janks, PC | Gregory M Janks
    Yes. Whether the court or the other side agree that the interpreter will be the "official" interpreter that goes on the record has to be ironed out with the other side and the Judge.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 4/3/2014
    Lawyer for Independent Media
    Lawyer for Independent Media | Sue Basko
    California Courts provide interpreters for some hearings and not for others. In a Criminal, Traffic, Juvenile, or Family Court hearing, the court will provide an interpreter. You need to ask at the desk. Your hearing may or may not be continued so you can be provided with an interpreter. In a civil or small claims matter, you have to provide your own interpreter. You can choose a registered interpreter. If you decide to use a non-registered interpreter, such as a friend of family member, have the person look online for this California Court form and read it. it is called Foreign Language Interpreter's Duties - Civil and Small Claims (INT-200).
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/4/2014
    Law Offices of Grinberg and Segal
    Law Offices of Grinberg and Segal | Alexander Segal
    Usually an interpreter is provided by the court. You can bring someone to interpret, but this person will not be the official interpreter.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 4/3/2014
    Stacy Joel Safion, Esq.
    Stacy Joel Safion, Esq. | Stacy Joel Safion
    Yes. He should be court certified.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/2/2014
    Sebby Law Office
    Sebby Law Office | Jayne Sebby
    It depends on what kind of case it is and who is hearing it. If it's an administrative hearing, you may be responsible for bringing your own interpreter. If it's a civil, and especially if it's a criminal case, the court may choose to appoint an interpreter. The issue is that the judge must be sure that the interpreter is qualified to quickly and accurately interpret from one language to another, including any legal terms or jargon or slang, and that the interpreter does not add his own comments or interpretation to what the speaker is communicating.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 4/2/2014
    Law Office Of Victor Waid
    Law Office Of Victor Waid | Victor Waid
    Yes, must be sworn in and take an oath that he will interpret faithfully in both languages.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/2/2014
    A Fresh Start
    A Fresh Start | Dorothy G Bunce
    In Bankruptcy court, the official court interpreting service must be utilized. Before the court implemented this requirement, interpreters exercised questionable judgment and would deliberately misinterpret in order to "help out" the person testifying, and not in a good way.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 4/2/2014
    Charles M. Schiff, Attorney at Law
    Charles M. Schiff, Attorney at Law | Charles M. Schiff
    A defendant can have someone with him but the Court will provide a court-certified interpreter for all in-court proceedings.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 4/2/2014
    Coane and Associates
    Coane and Associates | Bruce Coane
    Yes, but whether the judge allows the interpreter to participate or not,is up to the judge, or the local rules of court, or other rules in the jurisdiction.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 4/2/2014
    Andrew T. Velonis, P.C.
    Andrew T. Velonis, P.C. | Andrew Velonis
    Yes, but the translation won't be considered "official".
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 4/2/2014
    Fox & Fox, S.C. | Richard F. Rice
    Contact your attorney or the Court to find out.
    Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
    Replied: 4/3/2014
    Austin Legal Services, PLC
    Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
    Yes, as long as they are qualified.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 4/2/2014
    Law Office of Thomas A. Medford, Jr., PC
    Law Office of Thomas A. Medford, Jr., PC | Thomas A. Medford, Jr.
    Yes but in the District of Columbia the court may require that that interpreter by certified or have a certain skill level. If given enough notice the courts will generally be able to find an interpreter for almost any language.
    Answer Applies to: District of Columbia
    Replied: 4/2/2014
    Peyton and Associates | Barbara Peyton
    Yes. The person should have some experience or be otherwise certified as an interpreter.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/2/2014
    Law Offices of Eric W. I. Anglin
    Law Offices of Eric W. I. Anglin | Eric W. I. Anglin
    I believe that you would need to seek approval from the Court and possibly all parties to confirm that the interpreter is qualified.
    Answer Applies to: Indiana
    Replied: 4/2/2014
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    Nope. Must be court-certified.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/2/2014
    Law Office of Kirk Buhler
    Law Office of Kirk Buhler | Kirk A Buhler
    Generally a defendant can bring their own interpreter, witnesses and evidence to support their side of the case. The judge would have the right to allow, or not allow, the translation as accurate.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/2/2014
    Danville Law Group | Scott Jordan
    Yes, however, the interpreter must be certified by the court.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 4/2/2014
    Law Office of Lynnmarie A. Johnson
    Law Office of Lynnmarie A. Johnson | Lynnmarie Johnson
    Generally yes, but will be responsible for the cost.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 4/2/2014
    Candiano Law Office
    Candiano Law Office | Charles J. Candiano
    Only if all parties and the Court agree.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 4/2/2014
    Barton Barton & Plotkin
    Barton Barton & Plotkin | Maurice Ross
    Maybe. But the court reporter will have an official interpreter who his certified as qualified by the Court, and the official reporter will be used to prepare the transcript unless the Court orders otherwise. A defendant can always bring his own interpreter, but whether the interpreter will be allowed to participate in the proceedings is questionable, and depends on the interpreters professional qualifications.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 4/2/2014
    Gates' Law, PLLC | Thomas E. Gates
    No, they must be court certified and independent of the defendant.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 4/2/2014
    Diane l. Berger | Diane L. Berger
    An interpreter has to be court certified to be used during a court proceeding.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 4/2/2014
    Banner & Witcoff, Ltd. | Ernie Linek
    Maybe - if the Judge approves in advance. Check with the Court.
    Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
    Replied: 4/3/2014
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