Can the courts still hold me liable if in my divorce decree I am to be held harmless of the judgments on my credit that my husband is responsible for? 10 Answers as of April 15, 2014

I went through a divorce in 2010. He is to be responsible. I recently sent a copy of that paperwork to all 3 credit bureaus and all of them deleted those judgments from my credit.

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The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC
The Law Office of Darren Aronow, PC | Darren Aronow
Credit companies did not agree. Your agreement is with your husband for which you can sue him for damages.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 4/15/2014
Law Office of Martin A. Kahan | Martin A. Kahan
The creditor can still try to collect from you. The terms of your divorce are not binding on the creditors.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 4/15/2014
James T. Weiner & Associates, P.C.
James T. Weiner & Associates, P.C. | James T. Weiner
Yes the courts can still hold you liable for the debts if you are on the loan. Your divorce judgment does not effect your liability to the creditors, it only affects who pays the debt.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 4/15/2014
Mediation Services of Southwest Florida
Mediation Services of Southwest Florida | Dennis J. Leffert, J.D.
Credit card companies are not bound by your Divorce Decree. If you are a signatory on the account, they can go after you. Your recourse is to go back to Court and ask the Judge for an Order requiring your spouse to pay or reimburse you, whichever the case may be, and ask the Court to Order him to pay your Attorney fees and costs.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 4/15/2014
Law Office of Lauren Deann Dozier PLLC.
Law Office of Lauren Deann Dozier PLLC. | Lauren Dozier
Yes. The courts still consider you liable. However you can always file a motion with your family court judge requesting that the judge enforce your judgment of divorce. If your husband was responsible for the debt he should be paying it and if he is not then the courts have the power to make him do so.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 4/15/2014
    SmithMarco, P.C.
    SmithMarco, P.C. | Larry P. Smith
    Yes. That decree is between you and your ex only. The creditors were not part of that hearing and did not have their own say. Perhaps if they had the chance, they would come into court and say that they would rather you be the responsible party because you are more responsible. So since they were not there, a court cannot adjudicate their rights away. They have continued rights to pursue both of you. Your remedy is to go back after your ex to pay you back for any payments you had to make.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 4/15/2014
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC
    Musilli Brennan Associates PLLC | John F Brennan
    Yes, the courts could still hold you liable for any joint debts which he does not pay, regardless of the fact that they were assigned to him in the divorce decree. Your remedy is to take him back to be held in contempt of the court for failing to comply with the judgment. That does not however provide you with the defense from a creditor who you legally owe.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 4/15/2014
    Peters Law, PLLC
    Peters Law, PLLC | Mark T. Peters, Sr.
    The court can't hold you liable, but the companies that you owe money to can. If they were to collect from you, you would then go after your husband for what you paid. The only good thing is that he cannot discharge his obligation to you in bankruptcy.
    Answer Applies to: Idaho
    Replied: 4/15/2014
    Edelman, Combs, Latturner & Goodwin, LLC | Daniel A. Edelman
    Yes. A divorce decree or separation agreement deals with the liability of spouses between themselves. If a creditor extended credit to both of you, it can hold both of you liable regardless of such agreements/ decrees.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 4/15/2014
    Timothy Casey Theisen, P.A. | Tim Theisen
    Yes. Your divorce decree is a contract with your former spouse that is not binding on third parties.
    Answer Applies to: Minnesota
    Replied: 4/15/2014
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