Can a convicted felon get a green card from their citizen spouse? 4 Answers as of February 13, 2011

Can I get a green card if convicted of a felony even though I am married to us citizen?

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William C. Gosnell, Attorney at Law
William C. Gosnell, Attorney at Law | William C. Gosnell
No they cannot.
Answer Applies to: Tennessee
Replied: 2/13/2011
JCS Immigration & Visa Law Office
JCS Immigration & Visa Law Office | Jack C. Sung
Yes you can get a green card as a convicted felon but it depends on what kind of felony you committed and whether you entered the US with a visa. To receive a green card, you must prove (1) you entered with inspection from a port of entry (either you drove into the US with your visa or flew into the US with a valid visa), and (2) that you are admissible into the US as a green card holder. Certain crimes will render you inadmissible, such as murder and rape or burglary. Other crimes, while they are felony convictions, does not have much effect on admissibility. Without knowing more about what felony convictions you have, your question is unanswerable.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/8/2011
Law Office of Immigration & International Trade Law
Law Office of Immigration & International Trade Law | Linda Liang
If your felony offense is one of moral turpitude offense, you will be denied. Marrying to a US citizen does not grant you privilege. Nobody is beyond the law. You should hire a lawyer. You can call us if you want.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 2/8/2011
Nicastro Piscopo, APLC
Nicastro Piscopo, APLC | Louis M. Piscopo
Yes, a convicted felony may still be eligible for a Green Card. Not all convictions, even if felonies, make you inadmissible to the U.S. Even if inadmissible, you could still be eligible for a waiver which would allow you Green Card application to be approved. You should speak to an immigration attorney to find out it you are eligible, make sure to have a certified copy of the conviction documents for the attorney to review.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/8/2011
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