Can a client use the lawyer they work for as representation? 55 Answers as of July 25, 2011

Can a client use the lawyer they work for as representation?

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Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law
Thomas J. Tomko Attorney At law | Thomas J. Tomko
Generally, the answer is yes. However, there may be a situation where there is a conflict. Without more information,I cannot tell whether there is anything preventing your employer from representing you. It may not be wise to do this, as the employer will know your private business. You will need to decide that one. I hope that this was helpful.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 7/25/2011
Jules N. Fiani, Attorney at Law
Jules N. Fiani, Attorney at Law | Jules Fiani
Yes.
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 7/22/2011
Michael Breczinski
Michael Breczinski | Michael Breczinski
Ask the lawyer but unless there is some conflict of interest the answer is yes. M
Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 7/14/2011
Law Offices of Carl Spector
Law Offices of Carl Spector | Carl Spector
Yes, an attorney may represent an employee in a case.
Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 7/14/2011
Law Office of Tracey S. Sang
Law Office of Tracey S. Sang | Tracey Sang
Absolutely!
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 7/14/2011
    Law Offices of Martina A. Vigil, PC
    Law Offices of Martina A. Vigil, PC | Martina A. Vigil
    Yes. Unless there is an actual conflict resulting from the representation.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/13/2011
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser
    Law Office of Phillip Weiser | Phillip L. Weiser
    As long as there is no conflict of interest, you may hire any attorney you wish.
    Answer Applies to: Kansas
    Replied: 7/13/2011
    The Law Office of B. Elaine Jones
    The Law Office of B. Elaine Jones | B. Elaine Jones
    Dear Sir/Madam - Sure they can use the lawyer they work for as representation. However, depending on the subject matter of the case, the client or lawyer may not want to enter into another relationship besides boss/employee.
    Answer Applies to: Florida
    Replied: 7/13/2011
    Edward  D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law
    Edward D. Dowling IV Attorney at Law | Edward D. Dowling IV
    I would need further details to answer that in your case,but in general there is nothing prohibiting the attorney and the client from entering into an agreement for the lawyer to represent the client unless there is some conflict of interest tat would disqualify the attorney.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/19/2011
    Law Office of Richard Williams
    Law Office of Richard Williams | Richard Williams
    Unless there is a conflict for any reason, you may use the attorney that you are employed by for legal representation.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 7/13/2011
    Law Offices of John Carney
    Law Offices of John Carney | John Carney
    If you work for an attorney you can retain him to handle any type of case. The real question is whether he is skilled and experienced in the type of case you have. You need a criminal lawyer for a serious matter, but not for a simple shoplifting or marijuana possession case.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/13/2011
    Law Office of Rodney Nosratabadi
    Law Office of Rodney Nosratabadi | Rodney Nosratabadi
    Unless there exists a conflict of interest or a potential for a conflict of interest, an employer attorney can establish an attorney-client relationship with his employee. However, more information is required to better assess the conflict.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Palumbo and Kosofsky
    Palumbo and Kosofsky | Michael Palumbo
    Can a client use the lawyer they work for as representation? In other words, can I represent an employee of mine - yes, absolutely.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    The Chastaine Law Office
    The Chastaine Law Office | Michael Chastaine
    Not a problem, unless there is a conflict of interest.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh
    Law Office of Jeff Yeh | Jeff Yeh
    Yes, unless there is some unusual conflict of interest in the relationship.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Law Offices of Steven R. Decker
    Law Offices of Steven R. Decker | Steven Decker
    You can emply your boss also as your lawyer unless the crime involves an issue where the lawyer became a witness.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Lacy Fields, Attorney at Law, LLC
    Lacy Fields, Attorney at Law, LLC | Lacy Fields
    Sure. It might get weird though since your lawyer usually winds up learning all your dirty little secrets. Especially in civil lawsuits your attorney will learn about any criminal history, past injuries, past lawsuits and other conflicts, relationship issues, etc. If you and your boss are both comfortable with that then I see no reason not to proceed.
    Answer Applies to: Missouri
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Law Office of Roianne H. Conner
    Law Office of Roianne H. Conner | Roianne Houlton Conner
    There is no reason why an attorney with whom you work can not represent you. However, the attorney may feel uncomfortable and may want to refer your representation to someone else.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg
    Law Office of Eric Sterkenburg | Eric Sterkenburg
    Yes they may. You need to make sure that there is no breach of confidentiall or conflict of interests.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Nelson & Lawless
    Nelson & Lawless | Terry Nelson
    Sure. It may create problems at work if something goes wrong, but it is not illegal.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Osterman Law LLC
    Osterman Law LLC | Mark D. Osterman
    I cannot see why not, but you need to consult with your boss, the lawyer. There are confidence issues. Sometimes the lawyer finds out things you may think are embarrassing or could cost you your job. I have done it for my employees and their spouses in the past. Good Luck.
    Answer Applies to: Indiana
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Law Office of Jared Altman
    Law Office of Jared Altman | Jared Altman
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Harden Law Offices
    Harden Law Offices | Leonard D. Harden
    Yes, but it can create tension and may result in a lack of objectivity. I would probably decline and help employee find a good friend colleague to help instead of representing my employee.
    Answer Applies to: New Hampshire
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Michael Anthony Wing, P.C.
    Michael Anthony Wing, P.C. | Michael Anthony Wing
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: Alabama
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Grant & Grant
    Grant & Grant | Richard L. Grant, Esq.
    Generally speaking, absent any conflicts of interest and other compelling issues, it is best that you have separate and different experienced criminal defense counsel representing you in your criminal matter. This would also apply, especially if the lawyer you worked for is not an experienced criminal attorney and regularly practices criminal law. It is recommended that you immediately consult with an experienced Criminal Defense Attorney without any further delay.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Jonathan S. Willett Attorney at Law
    Jonathan S. Willett Attorney at Law | Jonathan S. Willett
    Yes you can.
    Answer Applies to: Colorado
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Giannini Law Office, PC
    Giannini Law Office, PC | Robert Giannini
    The short answer is "yes." It may or may not be a good idea, though. If the case does not turn out well it could cause a strain on the relationship. But, I know of no legal prohibitions to an attorney representing his employee on a matter unrelated to the employment.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Lawrence Lewis
    Lawrence Lewis | Lawrence Lewis, PC
    Sure. I pray that the attorney is familiar with the area in which you need him.
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly
    Law Office of Brendan M. Kelly | Brendan M. Kelly
    It would depend on the relationship. I'm not sure I would want my employee know about a crime I was charged with, but it may be the cheapest means to obtain legal counsel and would not be a direct conflict.
    Answer Applies to: Nebraska
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Andersen Law PLLC
    Andersen Law PLLC | Craig Andersen
    Yes although I don't recommend it. Depending on the circumstances, it may be necessary to share confidences with one's attorney. Those confidences may compromise the employee by sharing their secrets with an employer. It's a good idea to keep a wall up between you and your employer and to maintain a clear boundary between personal and business.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    The Lee Law Firm
    The Lee Law Firm | Kenneth Parks Gober
    Technically yes, it may or may not be a good idea based on the relationship with employer/attorney and the nature of the crime charged. Good Luck.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Howard W. Collins, Attorney at Law
    Howard W. Collins, Attorney at Law | Howard W. Collins
    Assume Oregon law: The answer to your question so long as there is no ethical conflict in doing so, it may be possible. Is it wise; well that is another question entirely.
    Answer Applies to: Oregon
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Law Offices of Sean Logue
    Law Offices of Sean Logue | Sean Logue
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: Pennsylvania
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Law Office of Andrew Subin
    Law Office of Andrew Subin | Andrew Subin
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Austin Legal Services, PLC
    Austin Legal Services, PLC | Jared Austin
    Any lawyer can represent you as long as they are a member of the bar in good standing. The fact that they are your employer doesn't change anything.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC
    Klisz Law Office, PLLC | Timothy J. Klisz
    Sure. I see no problem with that.
    Answer Applies to: Michigan
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Law Office of Kathryn L. Hudson
    Law Office of Kathryn L. Hudson | Kathryn L. Hudson
    There is nothing preventing your attorney employer from representing you but you might want there to be a disclosure in your retainer agreement. A conflict could potentially exist if the case does not turn out as you would like making it awkward to continue working for him.
    Answer Applies to: Arkansas
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Wallin & Klarich: A Law Corporation
    Wallin & Klarich: A Law Corporation | Paul Wallin
    yes, so long as the lawyer is experienced in the area of law you need, there is no law that would prevent you from having a lawyer you work for represent you on a legal matter. However, if you are facing a criminal charge, unless the lawyer you work for is an expert in that area and concentrates in representing persons accused of crimes it likely would not be a wise decision to do so.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C.
    Dennis Roberts, a P.C. | Dennis Roberts
    Of course, though I hope he has experience in criminal law.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Goolsby Law Office
    Goolsby Law Office | Richard Goolsby
    I would recommend that you talk with that attorney about this matter, including whether or not there exists any potential conflict of interest based upon all the facts. In any event, you should retain a criminal defense attorney to represent you. Good luck!
    Answer Applies to: Georgia
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Bloom Legal, LLC
    Bloom Legal, LLC | Seth J. Bloom
    If you speak to the attorney you work for about representing you and they agree to do so then there shouldn't be any issue with this. It would not be permissible for you to indicate that the attorney you work for is representing you just because you work for them if you have not actually discussed this with them. If you work for an attorney and are in need of legal representation, speak to them directly about the possibility of representing you before you make any indication that there has been an arrangement made.
    Answer Applies to: Louisiana
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Law Office of James E. Smith
    Law Office of James E. Smith | James Smith
    Yes. This is common as long as there is no conflict.
    Answer Applies to: Nevada
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S.
    Freeborn Law Offices, P.S. | Steve Freeborn
    Yes, that generally is not a problem, assuming that lawyer has expertise in that area of law, and there is no conflict of interest. By this, I mean, if the lawyer has represented an individual who has ties to the case of his employee, then there would be a potential conflict of interest that would prevent representation.
    Answer Applies to: Washington
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer
    Cynthia Henley, Lawyer | Cynthia Henley
    There is no ethical or legal prohibition against it and in fact it happens frequently.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Judin & Rogers
    Judin & Rogers | Hank Judin
    Sure. As long as there is not a conflict.
    Answer Applies to: Texas
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Rothstein Law PLLC
    Rothstein Law PLLC | Eric Rothstein
    Are you asking if the lawyer you work for can represent you in a case? The answer to that is YES assuming there is no conflict of interest with a client. Also, be sure that the lawyer has experience in the area you need counsel.
    Answer Applies to: New York
    Replied: 7/12/2011
    Deal & Hooks, LLC
    Deal & Hooks, LLC | Shawn P. Hooks
    Yes. That is not, by itself, a conflict of interest.
    Answer Applies to: Ohio
    Replied: 7/12/2011
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