As a beneficiary, can I require the executor to give me a copy of will and video? 7 Answers as of March 06, 2015

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LAW OFFICE OF ROBERT I LONG
LAW OFFICE OF ROBERT I LONG | Robert I. Long
Not if the testator is alive. Yes, if you are either an heir of a deceased testator or have knowledge of being named a beneficiary in the Will, such as a pre-death letter from the testator informing you of that.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 3/6/2015
Law Ofices of Edwin K. Niles | Edwin K. Niles
Yes, as beneficiary you are entitled to a copy of the will. Probate Code 8003 and 8110.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/17/2015
Stephens Gourley & Bywater | David A. Stephens
Yes, if the testator has passed away. If not, you do not generally have a right to see and will without the consent of the Testator.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 2/17/2015
Goldsmith & Guymon
Goldsmith & Guymon | Dara Goldsmith
As a beneficiary, you are entitled to receive a copy of the Will. You can also order a copy from the Court where it has been lodged. In Nevada Wills are to be lodged within 30 days of death. By video, do you mean of the signing? You may not be entitled to that unless there is a Will contest. You can probably file a motion with the court to view the video to determine if you should contest.
Answer Applies to: Nevada
Replied: 2/17/2015
James Law Group
James Law Group | Christine James
Yes you are absolutely entitled to a copy of the will. Not sure about the video. SPEAK DIRECTLY TO AN ATTORNEY.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/16/2015
    Law Office Of Victor Waid
    Law Office Of Victor Waid | Victor Waid
    Yes. May have to litigate with the executor, unless items have been filed with the probate court.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/16/2015
    Law Offices of George H. Shers | George H. Shers
    Of the Will, yes. The video does not really have any effect on the Will, so I suppose the executor could say no. But if the Will needs to be probated, the executor named in the Will does not automatically become in charge of the estate, as the Court must appoint someone, and if the executor has refused to be reasonable, the Court might appoint someone else. You should read up on how probate is handled; see the simple books by Nolo Press to start.
    Answer Applies to: California
    Replied: 2/16/2015
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