Are you considered a citizen if you have been married for 8 years? 5 Answers as of February 08, 2011

My aunt moved here from Italy when she was six. She is now 43, a mother of two children, and has been married twice. Is she considered a citizen if she has been married? She was married to her first husband for 8 years and just remarried this year to her current husband.

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William C. Gosnell, Attorney at Law
William C. Gosnell, Attorney at Law | William C. Gosnell
Her new husband should file I-130 for a visa and start the process.
Answer Applies to: Tennessee
Replied: 2/8/2011
Law Office of Immigration & International Trade Law
Law Office of Immigration & International Trade Law | Linda Liang
Marriage does not give you immigration status. She must have been petitioned in order to be obtain green card and then obtain citizenship.
Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 2/7/2011
Nicastro Piscopo, APLC
Nicastro Piscopo, APLC | Louis M. Piscopo
No you do not become a U.S. Citizen through marriage. First, you have to become a Legal Permanent Resident, then after three or five years you can file for citizenship. So unless your aunt received her LPR status when she came at age 6, or later when she married her first husband, she is not a LPR merely because she has lived here so long.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/7/2011
The Vega Law Firm
The Vega Law Firm | Linda Vega
No.
Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 2/7/2011
Marie Michaud Attorney At Law
Marie Michaud Attorney At Law | Marie Michaud
Your aunt is not a citizen because she has been here for so many years. Actually, she only get a status (Such as green card or citizenship) if she applied for it and it was approved. She is a citizen if she ever applied for naturalization and it was approved. Sometimes, people who come here as a child do not understand their immigration status. If she doesn't know it, she should ask her parents or ask an immigration attorney who can inquire directly with he USCIS.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 2/7/2011
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