Am I responsible for my husband’s medical bills if he dies and has no assets? 7 Answers as of May 21, 2013

Ask a Local Attorney. 100% Anonymous. Free Answers.

Free Case Evaluation by a Local Lawyer: Click here
Law Office of John C. Farrell, Jr.
Law Office of John C. Farrell, Jr. | John C. Farrell, Jr.
If there is an estate the medical providers may put a lien on it.
Answer Applies to: Massachusetts
Replied: 5/21/2013
Michelotti & Associates, Ltd. | Joseph Michelotti
Yes, Family purpose.
Answer Applies to: Illinois
Replied: 5/20/2013
Stacy Joel Safion, Esq.
Stacy Joel Safion, Esq. | Stacy Joel Safion
Yes you are. Medical bills are community property.
Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 5/20/2013
Law Office of D.L. Drain, P.A.
Law Office of D.L. Drain, P.A. | Diane L. Drain
It depends on the law of the state where you live. Yes, if in Arizona and you were married during the time the medical expenses were incurred.
Answer Applies to: Arizona
Replied: 5/20/2013
Coulter's Law
Coulter's Law | Coulter K. Richardson
Technically, no. What you must do is notify the creditors of his death and they can attempt to collect from the estate. However, if there is no money in the estate, it will be a pointless endeavor. If they threaten to sue you, tell them to buzz off. If they sue you, defend yourself.
Answer Applies to: New Jersey
Replied: 5/20/2013
    Scott Goldstein | Scott Goldstein
    Yes.
    Answer Applies to: New Jersey
    Replied: 5/20/2013
    Edelman, Combs, Latturner & Goodwin, LLC | Daniel A. Edelman
    Possibly. Illinois has a family expense statute which makes a spouse liable for expenses of the family incurred by the other spouse. Medical expenses generally qualify. However, under the federal Equal Credit Opportunity Act each spouse has the right to obtain credit on their own, without the involvement of the other spouse. If your husband signed an admission form or other agreement with the provider, and you did not, you may not be liable. There is an old statement by the Federal Reserve Board that state family expense statutes are displaced by the Equal Credit Opportunity Act.
    Answer Applies to: Illinois
    Replied: 5/20/2013
Click to View More Answers: